Breaking News
  • Baking

    the process by which bread products are produced from dough. The principal raw materials in baking are wheat and ryeflours of various grades, water, bakers’ yeast, and salt. Supplementary ingredients may include sugar, starch syrup,shortening, liquid and dry milk, whey, eggs, poppy seed, and spices. The major steps in baking are reception and storage ofingredients; preparation, dividing, and proofing of the dough; and baking, cooling, and, sometimes, packaging of the bread. Flour is usually delivered to bakeries in the tanks of flour trucks, from which it is pumped under pressure through pipes tohoppers located in storerooms. Before the flour is mixed with the other ingredients, it is sifted and freed of ferromagneticimpurities with magnets. During storage various biochemical changes occur that improve the flour’s baking qualities. The preparation of dough consists in mixing the flour, water, salt, and yeast, a leavened dough (sponge), or a ferment,together with any other ingredients. Salt and sugar are measured out in the form of filtered aqueous solutions, the yeast inthe form of an aqueous suspension, and the shortening in a melted state. During preparation of the dough the flour particlesexpand as the water combines with albumins, starch, and pentosans; lactic and other organic acids accumulate as a result ofthe activity of lactic acid bacteria, and the yeast cells are activated (the fermentation activity is increased) and multiply. Thehydrolytic action of the enzymes in the dough increases the amount of sugars and water-soluble albumins. The expansion ofthe flour particles enables the dough to retain its shape and the gas produced by the yeast. The organic acids give bread aslightly sour taste. The yeast cells in dough give rise to alcoholic fermentation with the formation of ethyl alcohol and carbondioxide gas; the carbon dioxide bubbles expand the dough and ensure a porous structure in the crumb. The traditional methods of preparing wheat dough are the sponge-and-dough (batch) and straight-dough methods. In thelatter, all the ingredients are mixed at one time, and the dough is ready after two or three hours; in the sponge-and-doughmethod, a sponge is first mixed to produce a more liquid dough from 50–70 percent of the total amount of flour and the entireamount of yeast. After four to five hours the remainder of the flour, water, and other ingredients are added to the fermenteddough, which is then mixed to proper development and left to ferment for one or two hours. Somewhat less yeast(approximately 1 percent) is required for this method than for the straight-dough method (1.5–3 percent). In a new method that shortens the bread production cycle and facilitates mechanization and automation of the process, thedough is prepared as a liquid sponge mixed from approximately 30 percent of the total flour. As a result, the lactic acidfermentation processes and the activation and multiplication of the yeast occur in a liquid sponge, which acceleratesfermentation and facilitates transportation and metering of the sponge. The accelerated effect may also be obtained by aseparate preparation of 5–15 percent of the flour with a lactic acid ferment or a semifinished product for activation of theyeast. The new method makes it possible to optimize the basic maturing processes for the dough and reduce the volume ofequipment needed. If the dough is prepared by mixing all ingredients at one time together with food acids (lactic, citric, andmalic) or whey (liquid, concentrated, or dried) in quantities sufficient to create the required acidity in the bread, the processcan be accelerated to a still greater degree. All the accelerated methods are economical. They are characterized byintensification of the biochemical, microbiological, and colloidal processes in the dough; for example, the fermentation time isno more than 30–40 minutes. Preparation of the dough can also be accelerated by adding amylolytic and proteolytic fermentation preparations,ameliorators of the oxidizing processes (ascorbic acid, potassium bromate, or potassium iodate) and reducing processes(cysteine and sodium thiosulphate), and surface-active agents (monoglycerides and diglycerides, lecithin, and glycolipides). Rye dough and dough made of a mixture of rye and wheat flours may be prepared in either thick or liquid ferments. Theproduction properties of rye flour are responsible for the higher acidity and moisture of the dough compared with wheatdough. The readiness of the sponge, ferment, and dough is determined by the final acidity, or pH value, of the medium and by thefermentation activity. The acidity and moisture content of a dough and of the resulting bread are a function of the grade ofwheat or rye flour, the recipe, and the type of bread product produced. The dividing of wheat dough actually comprises the individual operations of dividing, rounding, intermediate proofing forseveral minutes (the internal stresses in the dough are resorbed and the structure is partially restored), molding, and finalproofing. For dough made of rye flour, the process is restricted to dividing, molding, and final proofing. The final proofing ofpieces of dough is accompanied by a fermentation process, which makes it possible to obtain bread with a well-aeratedcrumb. The duration varies widely—from 25 to 120 minutes. The readiness of a piece of dough is judged by the dough’svolume, aeration, and elasticity. Bread is baked in baking ovens. The dough may rest in metal pans (pan bread) or lie directly on the oven hearth (hearthbread). The heating forms a crust on the surface of the dough; at the same time, the albumins inside the dough aredenatured, and the starch is partially converted to a paste to form the crumb. The temperature in the middle of the crumbduring baking rises to 92°–98°C, and the crust is heated to 140°–175°C. The ferments in the dough cause hydrolyticdecomposition of the starch during baking, with an increase in the amount of water-soluble carbohydrates. In addition, in ryebread there is a partial acid hydrolysis of the starch. The higher temperature in the crust causes almost all moisture to be lost and results in dextrinization (partial disintegration)of the starch. In addition, processes of oxidation and reduction occur in the unfermented sugars and in the products from theproteolysis of the albumins in the dough; in the latter case, melanoidins are formed, which color the crust golden to brown. Agroup of intermediates and by-products is also formed—primarily volatile substances (over 200)—which together provide thedistinctive aroma of bread. Substantial humidification of the steam-air medium in the baking chamber during the initial bakingperiod increases the volume of the bread and makes the surface of the crust glossy. During baking, the dough loses part ofthe water, ethyl alcohol, and volatile substances. The difference between the weight of the dough that enters the oven andthe weight of the bread removed depends on the initial weight and the shape and ranges from 6 to 14 percent. After it is removed from the oven, the bread is cooled on trays in storerooms and dispatching rooms; it is then shipped tomarket. During cooling and storage, bread loses between 1.5 and 5 percent of its weight, primarily through moisture loss. The future development of baking calls for expansion of the variety of breads offered; improvements in the taste, aroma, andappearance of the products; and an increase in the output of enriched baked goods with more albumins, essential aminoacids, and vitamins. Baking can be made more efficient by intensification and modernization of the control methods used inthe production processes and by the development and introduction of integrated mechanization and automation for bakingenterprises.  

    Read More »
  • Essential Bread-Baking Equipment and Tools

  • Baking

    the process by which bread products are produced from dough. The principal raw materials in baking are wheat and ryeflours of various grades, water, bakers’ yeast, and salt. Supplementary ingredients may include sugar, starch syrup,shortening, liquid and dry milk, whey, eggs, poppy seed, and spices. The major steps in baking are reception and storage ofingredients; preparation, dividing, and proofing of the dough; and baking, cooling, and, sometimes, packaging of the bread. Flour is usually delivered to bakeries in the tanks of flour trucks, from which it is pumped under pressure through pipes tohoppers located in storerooms. Before the flour is mixed with the other ingredients, it is sifted and freed of ferromagneticimpurities with magnets. During storage various biochemical changes occur that improve the flour’s baking qualities. The preparation of dough consists in mixing the flour, water, salt, and yeast, a leavened dough (sponge), or a ferment,together with any other ingredients. Salt and sugar are measured out in the form of filtered aqueous solutions, the yeast inthe form of an aqueous suspension, and the shortening in a melted state. During preparation of the dough the flour particlesexpand as the water combines with albumins, starch, and pentosans; lactic and other organic acids accumulate as a result ofthe activity of lactic acid bacteria, and the yeast cells are activated (the fermentation activity is increased) and multiply. Thehydrolytic action of the enzymes in the dough increases the amount of sugars and water-soluble albumins. The expansion ofthe flour particles enables the dough to retain its shape and the gas produced by the yeast. The organic acids give bread aslightly sour taste. The yeast cells in dough give rise to alcoholic fermentation with the formation of ethyl alcohol and carbondioxide gas; the carbon dioxide bubbles expand the dough and ensure a porous structure in the crumb. The traditional methods of preparing wheat dough are the sponge-and-dough (batch) and straight-dough methods. In thelatter, all the ingredients are mixed at one time, and the dough is ready after two or three hours; in the sponge-and-doughmethod, a sponge is first mixed to produce a more liquid dough from 50–70 percent of the total amount of flour and the entireamount of yeast. After four to five hours the remainder of the flour, water, and other ingredients are added to the fermenteddough, which is then mixed to proper development and left to ferment for one or two hours. Somewhat less yeast(approximately 1 percent) is required for this method than for the straight-dough method (1.5–3 percent). In a new method that shortens the bread production cycle and facilitates mechanization and automation of the process, thedough is prepared as a liquid sponge mixed from approximately 30 percent of the total flour. As a result, the lactic acidfermentation processes and the activation and multiplication of the yeast occur in a liquid sponge, which acceleratesfermentation and facilitates transportation and metering of the sponge. The accelerated effect may also be obtained by aseparate preparation of 5–15 percent of the flour with a lactic acid ferment or a semifinished product for activation of theyeast. The new method makes it possible to optimize the basic maturing processes for the dough and reduce the volume ofequipment needed. If the dough is prepared by mixing all ingredients at one time together with food acids (lactic, citric, andmalic) or whey (liquid, concentrated, or dried) in quantities sufficient to create the required acidity in the bread, the processcan be accelerated to a still greater degree. All the accelerated methods are economical. They are characterized byintensification of the biochemical, microbiological, and colloidal processes in the dough; for example, the fermentation time isno more than 30–40 minutes. Preparation of the dough can also be accelerated by adding amylolytic and proteolytic fermentation preparations,ameliorators of the oxidizing processes (ascorbic acid, potassium bromate, or potassium iodate) and reducing processes(cysteine and sodium thiosulphate), and surface-active agents (monoglycerides and diglycerides, lecithin, and glycolipides). Rye dough and dough made of a mixture of rye and wheat flours may be prepared in either thick or liquid ferments. Theproduction properties of rye flour are responsible for the higher acidity and moisture of the dough compared with wheatdough. The readiness of the sponge, ferment, and dough is determined by the final acidity, or pH value, of the medium and by thefermentation activity. The acidity and moisture content of a dough and of the resulting bread are a function of the grade ofwheat or rye flour, the recipe, and the type of bread product produced. The dividing of wheat dough actually comprises the individual operations of dividing, rounding, intermediate proofing forseveral minutes (the internal stresses in the dough are resorbed and the structure is partially restored), molding, and finalproofing. For dough made of rye flour, the process is restricted to dividing, molding, and final proofing. The final proofing ofpieces of dough is accompanied by a fermentation process, which makes it possible to obtain bread with a well-aeratedcrumb. The duration varies widely—from 25 to 120 minutes. The readiness of a piece of dough is judged by the dough’svolume, aeration, and elasticity. Bread is baked in baking ovens. The dough may rest in metal pans (pan bread) or lie directly on the oven hearth (hearthbread). The heating forms a crust on the surface of the dough; at the same time, the albumins inside the dough aredenatured, and the starch is partially converted to a paste to form the crumb. The temperature in the middle of the crumbduring baking rises to 92°–98°C, and the crust is heated to 140°–175°C. The ferments in the dough cause hydrolyticdecomposition of the starch during baking, with an increase in the amount of water-soluble carbohydrates. In addition, in ryebread there is a partial acid hydrolysis of the starch. The higher temperature in the crust causes almost all moisture to be lost and results in dextrinization (partial disintegration)of the starch. In addition, processes of oxidation and reduction occur in the unfermented sugars and in the products from theproteolysis of the albumins in the dough; in the latter case, melanoidins are formed, which color the crust golden to brown. Agroup of intermediates and by-products is also formed—primarily volatile substances (over 200)—which together provide thedistinctive aroma of bread. Substantial humidification of the steam-air medium in the baking chamber during the initial bakingperiod increases the volume of the bread and makes the surface of the crust glossy. During baking, the dough loses part ofthe water, ethyl alcohol, and volatile substances. The difference between the weight of the dough that enters the oven andthe weight of the bread removed depends on the initial weight and the shape and ranges from 6 to 14 percent. After it is removed from the oven, the bread is cooled on trays in storerooms and dispatching rooms; it is then shipped tomarket. During cooling and storage, bread loses between 1.5 and 5 percent of its weight, primarily through moisture loss. The future development of baking calls for expansion of the variety of breads offered; improvements in the taste, aroma, andappearance of the products; and an increase in the output of enriched baked goods with more albumins, essential aminoacids, and vitamins. Baking can be made more efficient by intensification and modernization of the control methods used inthe production processes and by the development and introduction of integrated mechanization and automation for bakingenterprises.  

    Read More »
  • Baking Tools and Equipment (and Their Uses)

  • Baking Industry

    the branch of the food-processing industry that produces various types of bread, rolls and baranki products, therapeutic anddietary baked goods, and enriched and un-enriched biscuits. The variety of products offered is great. In the USSR in 1975,the baking industry produced more than 15 percent of the total gross output and used 8 percent of the total fixed productionassets of the food-processing industry. The basic raw material used by the baking industry—flour—easily lends itself totransportation, but the finished products do not. Prolonged storage of most baked goods is impossible because of staling; asa result, production conforms to the daily requirements of retail outlets, which vary in quantity and assortment. By the beginning of World War I, prerevolutionary Russia had several large, mechanized baking enterprises in St.Petersburg, Moscow, Kiev, Odessa, and Kronstadt; however, small cottage bakeries predominated. The establishment of amodern baking industry in the USSR began with the construction of large bakeries in the 1930’s. The production base of theindustry is being continually expanded by the construction of new enterprises and the reconstruction of existing ones.Approximately 30 large-scale state bakeries are put into service annually, as well as 250 mechanized small-scale bakeries ofthe Central Cooperative Alliance in rural regions. Between 1956 and 1975 alone, more than 850 large-scale bakeries wereconstructed. By the beginning of 1976, there were approximately 16,000 enterprises in the baking industry, including morethan 5,000 state enterprises and approximately 11,000 cooperative enterprises; they employed more than 510,000 people.The average daily capacity of a bakery rose from 18 tons in 1940 to 54 tons in 1975. Annual bread production (in milliontons) was 2.4 in 1928, 24 in 1940, 24.3 in 1960, 32.3 in 1970, and 33.5 in 1975 (excluding home baking). Production in the baking industry in the USSR is highly concentrated. Of the total volume of bread baking in 1976, 20.5million tons was produced in 2,700 large-scale bakeries. Major trends in the technological progress of the industry includethe integrated mechanization and automation of bread production, transportation, and storage; the introduction of newtechnology; the development of continuous production lines for the preparation and shaping of the dough; and the baking ofbread in high-efficiency conveyor ovens with automatic control. The Soviet baking industry receives more than 20,000 unitsof production equipment annually. In 1975 there were more than 8,000 production lines and mechanized production lines inoperation, of which more than 1,700 featured integrated mechanization. Equipment has been introduced into bakeries for thebulk transportation and storage of flour and other ingredients, such as salt, liquid shortening, and sugar syrup; in 1976, 39percent of the total volume of flour was handled in this manner, according to the Ministry of the Food-processing Industry ofthe USSR. In 1974 the level of mechanization of production in the enterprises of the Ministry of the Food-processing Industry of theUSSR was as follows: 90 percent in the production of pan bread, 75 percent for hearth bread, 64 percent for small items soldby the piece, 51 percent for enriched products, 74 percent for baranki products, and 55 percent for enriched biscuits.Approximately 10 million tons (about 50 percent) of the output was produced by new production systems. In 1976, 65 percentof the bread produced was made with graded wheat flour, compared with 44.5 percent in 1953. The variety of productsoffered is substantially increasing, and the quality of bread and rolls is improving, especially the production of high-qualityloaves, small rolls, pastries, cakes, enriched biscuits, and baranki products. The output of rolls made with patent flourincreased by a factor of 1.5 from 1971 to 1975. In other socialist countries the baking industry is developing at a rapid pace. Mechanized bakeries are being constructed andmany have been put into operation. Specialized enterprises are being established, as well as enterprises producing bothbaked goods and other food products. In Czechoslovakia, for example, some baking enterprises are combined withconfectionery and macaroni enterprises. Among the capitalist countries there is a very high level of mechanization and automation in the baking industries of the USA,Great Britain, Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, and the Netherlands. The production of equipment for thebaking industry is most highly developed in the USA, Great Britain, the Netherlands, and the Federal Republic of Germany.  

    Read More »
  • Baking Tools and Equipment (and Their Uses)

  • Essential Baking Tools and Equipment for Every Baker’s Kitchen

Recent Posts

Baking Tools

Baking Pans Common sizes are 9” x 5” or 8 1/2” x 4 1/2”. Keep in mind that shiny pans reflect heat so baking time is generally longer. You’ll also get lighter crusts than breads baked in dark pans that absorb heat. Special pans for French Breads and other specialty …

Read More »

Baking Industry

the branch of the food-processing industry that produces various types of bread, rolls and baranki products, therapeutic anddietary baked goods, and enriched and un-enriched biscuits. The variety of products offered is great. In the USSR in 1975,the baking industry produced more than 15 percent of the total gross output and used 8 percent of the total fixed productionassets of the food-processing industry. The basic raw material used by the baking industry—flour—easily lends itself totransportation, but the finished products do not. Prolonged storage of most baked goods is impossible because of staling; asa result, production conforms to the daily requirements of retail outlets, which vary in quantity and assortment. By the beginning of World War I, prerevolutionary Russia had several large, mechanized baking enterprises in St.Petersburg, Moscow, Kiev, Odessa, and Kronstadt; however, small cottage bakeries predominated. The establishment of amodern baking industry in the USSR began with the construction of large bakeries in the 1930’s. The production base of theindustry is being continually expanded by the construction of new enterprises and the reconstruction of existing ones.Approximately 30 large-scale state bakeries are put into service annually, as well as 250 mechanized small-scale bakeries ofthe Central Cooperative Alliance in rural regions. Between 1956 and 1975 alone, more than 850 large-scale bakeries wereconstructed. By the beginning of 1976, there were approximately 16,000 enterprises in the baking industry, including morethan 5,000 state enterprises and approximately 11,000 cooperative enterprises; they employed more than 510,000 people.The average daily capacity of a bakery rose from 18 tons in 1940 to 54 tons in 1975. Annual bread production (in milliontons) was 2.4 in 1928, 24 in 1940, 24.3 in 1960, 32.3 in 1970, and 33.5 in 1975 (excluding home baking). Production in the baking industry in the USSR is highly concentrated. Of the total volume of bread baking in 1976, 20.5million tons was produced in 2,700 large-scale bakeries. Major trends in the technological progress of the industry includethe integrated mechanization and automation of bread production, transportation, and storage; the introduction of newtechnology; the development of continuous production lines for the preparation and shaping of the dough; and the baking ofbread in high-efficiency conveyor ovens with automatic control. The Soviet baking industry receives more than 20,000 unitsof production equipment annually. In 1975 there were more than 8,000 production lines and mechanized production lines inoperation, of which more than 1,700 featured integrated mechanization. Equipment has been introduced into bakeries for thebulk transportation and storage of flour and other ingredients, such as salt, liquid shortening, and sugar syrup; in 1976, 39percent of the total volume of flour was handled in this manner, according to the Ministry of the Food-processing Industry ofthe USSR. In 1974 the level of mechanization of production in the enterprises of the Ministry of the Food-processing Industry of theUSSR was as follows: 90 percent in the production of pan bread, 75 percent for hearth bread, 64 percent for small items soldby the piece, 51 percent for enriched products, 74 percent for baranki products, and 55 percent for enriched biscuits.Approximately 10 million tons (about 50 percent) of the output was produced by new production systems. In 1976, 65 percentof the bread produced was made with graded wheat flour, compared with 44.5 percent in 1953. The variety of productsoffered is substantially increasing, and the quality of bread and rolls is improving, especially the production of high-qualityloaves, small rolls, pastries, cakes, enriched biscuits, and baranki products. The output of rolls made with patent flourincreased by a factor of 1.5 from 1971 to 1975. In other socialist countries the baking industry is developing at a rapid pace. Mechanized bakeries are being constructed andmany have been put into operation. Specialized enterprises are being established, as well as enterprises producing bothbaked goods and other food products. In Czechoslovakia, for example, some baking enterprises are combined withconfectionery and macaroni enterprises. Among the capitalist countries there is a very high level of mechanization and automation in the baking industries of the USA,Great Britain, Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, and the Netherlands. The production of equipment for thebaking industry is most highly developed in the USA, Great Britain, the Netherlands, and the Federal Republic of Germany.  

Read More »

Baking

the process by which bread products are produced from dough. The principal raw materials in baking are wheat and ryeflours of various grades, water, bakers’ yeast, and salt. Supplementary ingredients may include sugar, starch syrup,shortening, liquid and dry milk, whey, eggs, poppy seed, and spices. The major steps in baking are reception and storage ofingredients; preparation, dividing, and proofing of the dough; and baking, cooling, and, sometimes, packaging of the bread. Flour is usually delivered to bakeries in the tanks of flour trucks, from which it is pumped under pressure through pipes tohoppers located in storerooms. Before the flour is mixed with the other ingredients, it is sifted and freed of ferromagneticimpurities with magnets. During storage various biochemical changes occur that improve the flour’s baking qualities. The preparation of dough consists in mixing the flour, water, salt, and yeast, a leavened dough (sponge), or a ferment,together with any other ingredients. Salt and sugar are measured out in the form of filtered aqueous solutions, the yeast inthe form of an aqueous suspension, and the shortening in a melted state. During preparation of the dough the flour particlesexpand as the water combines with albumins, starch, and pentosans; lactic and other organic acids accumulate as a result ofthe activity of lactic acid bacteria, and the yeast cells are activated (the fermentation activity is increased) and multiply. Thehydrolytic action of the enzymes in the dough increases the amount of sugars and water-soluble albumins. The expansion ofthe flour particles enables the dough to retain its shape and the gas produced by the yeast. The organic acids give bread aslightly sour taste. The yeast cells in dough give rise to alcoholic fermentation with the formation of ethyl alcohol and carbondioxide gas; the carbon dioxide bubbles expand the dough and ensure a porous structure in the crumb. The traditional methods of preparing wheat dough are the sponge-and-dough (batch) and straight-dough methods. In thelatter, all the ingredients are mixed at one time, and the dough is ready after two or three hours; in the sponge-and-doughmethod, a sponge is first mixed to produce a more liquid dough from 50–70 percent of the total amount of flour and the entireamount of yeast. After four to five hours the remainder of the flour, water, and other ingredients are added to the fermenteddough, which is then mixed to proper development and left to ferment for one or two hours. Somewhat less yeast(approximately 1 percent) is required for this method than for the straight-dough method (1.5–3 percent). In a new method that shortens the bread production cycle and facilitates mechanization and automation of the process, thedough is prepared as a liquid sponge mixed from approximately 30 percent of the total flour. As a result, the lactic acidfermentation processes and the activation and multiplication of the yeast occur in a liquid sponge, which acceleratesfermentation and facilitates transportation and metering of the sponge. The accelerated effect may also be obtained by aseparate preparation of 5–15 percent of the flour with a lactic acid ferment or a semifinished product for activation of theyeast. The new method makes it possible to optimize the basic maturing processes for the dough and reduce the volume ofequipment needed. If the dough is prepared by mixing all ingredients at one time together with food acids (lactic, citric, andmalic) or whey (liquid, concentrated, or dried) in quantities sufficient to create the required acidity in the bread, the processcan be accelerated to a still greater degree. All the accelerated methods are economical. They are characterized byintensification of the biochemical, microbiological, and colloidal processes in the dough; for example, the fermentation time isno more than 30–40 minutes. Preparation of the dough can also be accelerated by adding amylolytic and proteolytic fermentation preparations,ameliorators of the oxidizing processes (ascorbic acid, potassium bromate, or potassium iodate) and reducing processes(cysteine and sodium thiosulphate), and surface-active agents (monoglycerides and diglycerides, lecithin, and glycolipides). Rye dough and dough made of a mixture of rye and wheat flours may be prepared in either thick or liquid ferments. Theproduction properties of rye flour are responsible for the higher acidity and moisture of the dough compared with wheatdough. The readiness of the sponge, ferment, and dough is determined by the final acidity, or pH value, of the medium and by thefermentation activity. The acidity and moisture content of a dough and of the resulting bread are a function of the grade ofwheat or rye flour, the recipe, and the type of bread product produced. The dividing of wheat dough actually comprises the individual operations of dividing, rounding, intermediate proofing forseveral minutes (the internal stresses in the dough are resorbed and the structure is partially restored), molding, and finalproofing. For dough made of rye flour, the process is restricted to dividing, molding, and final proofing. The final proofing ofpieces of dough is accompanied by a fermentation process, which makes it possible to obtain bread with a well-aeratedcrumb. The duration varies widely—from 25 to 120 minutes. The readiness of a piece of dough is judged by the dough’svolume, aeration, and elasticity. Bread is baked in baking ovens. The dough may rest in metal pans (pan bread) or lie directly on the oven hearth (hearthbread). The heating forms a crust on the surface of the dough; at the same time, the albumins inside the dough aredenatured, and the starch is partially converted to a paste to form the crumb. The temperature in the middle of the crumbduring baking rises to 92°–98°C, and the crust is heated to 140°–175°C. The ferments in the dough cause hydrolyticdecomposition of the starch during baking, with an increase in the amount of water-soluble carbohydrates. In addition, in ryebread there is a partial acid hydrolysis of the starch. The higher temperature in the crust causes almost all moisture to be lost and results in dextrinization (partial disintegration)of the starch. In addition, processes of oxidation and reduction occur in the unfermented sugars and in the products from theproteolysis of the albumins in the dough; in the latter case, melanoidins are formed, which color the crust golden to brown. Agroup of intermediates and by-products is also formed—primarily volatile substances (over 200)—which together provide thedistinctive aroma of bread. Substantial humidification of the steam-air medium in the baking chamber during the initial bakingperiod increases the volume of the bread and makes the surface of the crust glossy. During baking, the dough loses part ofthe water, ethyl alcohol, and volatile substances. The difference between the weight of the dough that enters the oven andthe weight of the bread removed depends on the initial weight and the shape and ranges from 6 to 14 percent. After it is removed from the oven, the bread is cooled on trays in storerooms and dispatching rooms; it is then shipped tomarket. During cooling and storage, bread loses between 1.5 and 5 percent of its weight, primarily through moisture loss. The future development of baking calls for expansion of the variety of breads offered; improvements in the taste, aroma, andappearance of the products; and an increase in the output of enriched baked goods with more albumins, essential aminoacids, and vitamins. Baking can be made more efficient by intensification and modernization of the control methods used inthe production processes and by the development and introduction of integrated mechanization and automation for bakingenterprises.  

Read More »